Questions and Answers about Coronavirus

Super Reds

Blood Types Needed: A-, B-, O- and O+

“By choosing to donate Super Reds, you can safely donate enough for two red cell transfusions. That means a single donation can help two patients receive lifesaving treatment.” Your donation helps people having surgeries or organ transplants, or receiving treatment for trauma. People often receive transfusions during treatment for cancer and bleeding disorders.

You donate “just red blood cells” through an apheresis donation. Blood is drawn from your arm to a sterile machine that spins the blood to remove your red cells, returning your platelets and plasma to your arm. The entire visit, from registration to refreshments, takes about 1 hour 25 minutes.

Take your donation further!
With a busy race schedule every summer, donating Super Reds helps them give back to their community without skipping a much needed training run or ride leading up to their first race!

Prioritize time!
Between meetings and projects, she manages time wisely. With Super Reds, it only takes 3 donations to hit the max number of times to give in a year. That means max support for local patients with less visits to donate.

Show off your cape!
As a Mom, she already feels like a superhero. Donating Super Reds is her way to show off her cape to her kids and her community, which leaves more time for play time.

Travel knowing your impact!
Whether you travel a lot for pleasure or professionally; know that you’ve made a huge impact in someone’s life before you jet set.

Eligibility and Critical Need

A Super Reds donor must be blood type O, type A negative or type B negative and meet minimum blood volume requirements determined by weight, height*, and hemoglobin** (iron-containing oxygen transport metalloprotein in the red blood cells). A phlebotomist will review this in the screening process to see if you meet these requirements. If not, no worries, you will still be able to donate whole blood and help local patients in need.

*For Males 5’1’’ minimum, For Females 5’5’’ minimum
**For men, a normal red blood cell level in the range of hemoglobin is 13.0 g/dL to 18.2 g/dL; for women, 12.5 g/dL to 18.2 g/dL.

Some health conditions or medications may temporarily or permanently prevent people from donating blood. You can read more about eligibility here. If you still have any questions about your eligibility and want to discuss it further, please contact us: Email clinicalprogram@bloodworksnw.org or call 1-800-366-2831, ext. 2543

A Super Reds donation is at its most critical need when we see our blood supply take a dip. We want donors to be type O, type A negative or type B negative for Super Reds because we tend to utilize those types more frequently than others. This donation type helps us meet the local demand for red blood cells more efficiently and quickly.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why would donating Super Reds be more beneficial than whole blood?

It doubles your impact! By donating Super Reds you safely donate the equivalent of two red cell transfusions during one visit.

What is a Super Reds Donation?

If you are blood type O, type A negative or type B negative then you may be eligible to give enough red blood cells for two transfusions in a single visit through our apheresis (ay-fur-ee-sis). This donation results in twice as many red cells for patients. And it allows you to come in to donate three times a year with the same impact as donating whole blood six times a year.

What are red blood cells?

Red blood cells deliver oxygen throughout your body. Red Blood Cells are the most commonly transfused blood component.

How does the process work? What should I expect?

The apheresis process is simple: blood is drawn from the donor’s arm and the components are separated using a sterile, one-time use kit.. Only the red blood cells are collected while your plasma is safely returned to you with a saline solution. And of course, the process is completely supervised and safe for you!

How long does it take?

The entire visit, from registration to refreshments, takes about 1 hour 25 minutes. You may watch television or movies, listen to music, read or simply sit back and relax while helping save a life.

Do I need to prepare differently than a Whole Blood donation?

Nope. We recommend you come in having had a good meal and plenty of water as you would a Whole Blood donation.

Is it safe? Am I at a greater risk to experience side effects?

Each donation is closely supervised by trained staff. The amount of red cells collected does not compromise your health and the volume replacement (saline solution) helps replenish your fluids to avoid any side effects. New, sterile donation equipment (needle, tubing, collection bags) is used for each donor – it is virtually impossible to contract a disease from the process. And, if you’re curious, you can watch the whole process happen!

Will I feel any different than when I donate whole blood?

No difference. In fact, donors often feel better when donating Super Reds because they are getting all that awesome saline, platelets, and plasma back.

What are the specific requirements?

Apheresis red cell donors must be blood type O, type A negative or type B negative and meet minimum blood volume requirements determined by weight, height, and hemoglobin (for specific questions reach out). Donors must meet Hemoglobin (iron) requirements as listed here as well as meet weight requirements.

Why do you need specific blood types?

It takes donors of all blood types to maintain a stable community blood supply for patients. We want donors to be type O, type A negative or type B negative for Super Reds because we tend to utilize those types more frequently than others. This donation type helps us meet the local demand for red blood cells more efficiently and quickly.

How often can I donate Super Reds?

Up to three times a year! You may donate apheresis red cells once 112 days compared to every 56 days for whole blood donation. Overall this means more time in between appointments and fewer visits to Bloodworks.

How soon after donating Super Reds can I give whole blood, platelets, or plasma?

The waiting period is 112 days before your next whole blood, platelet, plasma or Super Reds donation!

Your gift of blood, time or money saves lives.